200510311102☆新書通報 (開始借閱日:94年11 月04 日)

新書通報 (開始借閱日:94年11 月04 日)(要看書目請按一下)

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遺傳工程與人的未來(QH442.P19 1997)

新進科技─遺傳工程正在蓬勃發展,複製人或將成為事實;它會帶來何種影響與挑戰?本書邀您同進入未來科技的領域之中。

Sergeant Murphy's busy day (PZ7.S7S6 1997)

 

Mrs. Sato's hens (PZ7.M66H86 1994)

FROM THE CRITICS BookList - Ilene Cooper In this easy reader, a child and Mrs. Sato count the eggs the hens are laying. On Monday, there are two white eggs; on Tuesday, three brown eggs; on Wednesday, four speckled eggs; on Thursday, five small eggs; on Friday, six big eggs. But on Saturday, there are no eggs to count--only chickens. The simple sentences are just right for beginning readers, and the watercolor art is pleasant, too, though it will probably not be clear to children that the characters are intended to be Asian. The book's small size is appealingly approachable.

The world's greatest collection of knock knock jokes and tongue twisters (PN6163.P54 1985)

 

 

The incredible painting of Felix Clousseau (PZ7.A3I2 1988)

ANNOTATION

A painter becomes famous when his paintings come to life.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

An unknown painter becomes an overnight sensation when his paintings imitate life too well by quacking, crawling, and erupting all over Paris.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly In this droll, sophisticated tale, an unknown artist enters a Paris contest with a painting of a duck; the repercussions are mighty when the painting begins to quack. Ages 3-up. (Oct.) School Library Journal K-Gr 2 Agee's strong solid shapes and somber colored drawings contrast with the clever and witty premise of his book. Set in Paris at the turn of the century, it recounts a grand art contest. Traditional academy painters show their grandiose masterpieces: The King on His Throne, The King on Horseback, The King in Armor. Then an unknown artist, Clousseau, shows his small painting of a duck. ``Outrageous'' is the response until the duck that he has painted quacks. All over Paris, his works come alive. A boa leaves its painting, black smoke billows from a painted volcano, and water gushes from a waterfall. Needless to say things get out of hand, and poor Clousseau lands in prison. One overlooked painting eventually saves the day. Agee's tongue-in-cheek scenario ends with a final double entendre. The outrageous yet gentle humor is sure to delight parents and children alike. Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library

Red leaf, yellow leaf (PZ7.E5 1999)

ANNOTATION

A child describes the growth of a maple tree from seed to sapling.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Lois Ehlert uses watercolor collage and pieces of actual seeds, fabric, wire, and roots in this innovative and rich introduction to the life of a tree. A special glossary explains how roots absorb nutrients, what photosynthesis is, how sap circulates, and other facts about trees.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Ehlert ( Color Zoo ) uses a variety of materials--including paper, ribbons and paints--to depict the beginning of a sugar maple's life. Some time after seeds fall from a tree in the woods, nursery workers collect the slender sprouts; years later the tree is sold to a customer (the young first-person narrator of the book), taken home and carefully planted. Once again Ehlert provides a visual bounty: her pages are awash in the riotous reds and golds of autumn and the fresh, vibrant greens of new growth. There is bounteous information, too: in addition to the tree itself she includes several varieties of birds and many of the objects associated with gardening. An appendix provides further details on the biology and upkeep of trees. Less successful is the story line linking the tree to the narrator; the child remains an unseen abstraction whose utterances (``I love my tree'') appear stiff and a bit forced. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin Hand youngest readers (and read aloud to even younger children) Lois Ehlert's Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf. Author/artist Ehlert describes a sugar maple's growth from seed to mature tree in all its fall regalia. Brilliant collages of paper, fabric, leaves, twigs, and the like illustrate the simple story (in large type for young readers) and the underlying facts (in small type for older readers). School Library Journal PreS-Gr 3-- This very striking book examines the life of a sugar maple tree from the point of view of a young child. Each spread is a visual masterpiece; Ehlert has added elements of collage and watercolored paper that lend sophistication and diversity to her ever-evolving style. Preschoolers will delight in naming objects found on each double-page spread, newly independent readers will appreciate the oversized type, and slightly older children will make use of the appendix explaining the various functions and parts of a tree, along with tips on selecting and planting one. Although the book is absolutely stunning, text and illustrations in several instances are not a perfect union. Youngsters may question the ``I'' in the opening narration, or wonder why seeds covered with snow are mentioned but not depicted. The cover spread is gorgeous, yet the title is not particularly apt or telling. Still, both public and school libraries will find this book popular and valuable, especially when used along with Janice Udry's A Tree Is Nice (HarperCollins, 1956) or Alvin Tresselt's The Dead Tree (Parents Magazine Pr., 1972; o.p.). --Eve Larkin, Chicago Public Library

Just in case you ever wonder (PZ7.L96G55 1992)

ANNOTATION A parent tells a child how special she is, both to the parent and to God.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

There are certain words that every child longs to hear... words of unconditional love, promises of support, prayers of encouragement. No child ever grows tired of hearing a parent's powerful reassurance to always be there for them... just in case they ever wonder.

This timeless classic from Max Lucado has now been updated with new original art created especially for this collector's edition. Just in Case You Ever Wonder wraps your children in its tender message of love, comfort, and protection, showing them that as they grow and change, you'll always be ther for them - whether it's "monsters in the closet" or times when other kids are mean. Beloved author, Max Lucado, helps you express unconditional love for your child, simply, powerfully, forever.

FROM THE CRITICS

Children's Literature - Childrens Literature This board book version of an original picture book is heavy on text. The message of how each child is special and how God put the child being read to into his or her family is appealing. The mother reflects back on the baby's early days, and reassures her child that she will always be there to love, comfort and teach about God. In spite of the format and published age, it is more appropriate for kids 3 to 5. A good choice for Christian parents who are comfortable in their relationships and ability to express their feelings to their kids and perhaps a stepping stone for those for whom it may be a little more difficult. 2000 (orig. 1992), Tommy Nelson, Ages 3 to 5, $5.99. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot— Children's Literature

Miss Nelson is back (PZ7.A5M35c 1982)

ANNOTATION

When their teacher has to go away for a week, the kids in room 207 plan to "really act up."

FROM THE PUBLISHER

When their teacher has to go away for a week, the kids in Room 207 plan to "really act up."

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Miss Nelson goes away for a week, and the kids in Room 207 fear that they'll have the dreaded substitute teacher, Viola Swamp. Instead, they get Principal Blandsworth, who bores them into taking drastic measures. ``A nutty sequel to Miss Nelson Is Missing,'' PW stated. ``Marshall's color cartoons and the twisty tale rise to stratospheric heights of buffoonery.'' (48) Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum Allard gives the reader a well-rounded teacher-character as mischievous as her students. Miss Nelson, with her warmth, insight, and sense of humor, is a welcome change from the usual, more one-sided portrayals of the teacher. During her absence from school, Miss Nelson's class hatches a clever plot allowing them to act out their "playing hooky" fantasies. But in the midst of their fun, the dread substitute, Miss Viola Swamp, descends upon them, wielding authority with a heavy hand. Miss Nelson is greeted exuberantly upon her return-but what has become of Miss Swamp? Marshall's cartoon-like illustrations perfectly complement the zany tone of the story.

Picky Mrs. Packle

ANNOTATION

After years of wearing only green clothes and eating only pickle foods, picky Mrs. Pickle learns that trying something new can be fun.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

After years of wearing only green clothes and eating only pickle foods, picky Mrs. Pickle learns that trying something new can be fun.

SYNOPSIS Picky Mrs. Pickle won't eat anything that isn't green or pickled. That is, until her stubborn niece, Sophie Claire, introduces Mrs. Pickle to a new, "non-pickle" ice cream flavor. Mrs. Pickle will never be the same again.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Anyone who has attempted to persuade someone stuck in their ways to try something new will find an ally in this tale of an eccentric who finally gives in. "I needn't ever change because I'm happy where I'm at," declares Mrs. Pickle, who wears nothing but green and eats nothing but pickles: pickle parfait ice cream, pickle bread, pickle pie. Her poodle and alter ego, Dill, sports a green sweater and eats pickles from a green dog dish. Schneider's (Jeremy's Muffler) art features wildly skewed perspectives, an impressive array of verdant, distorted shapes and loads of funny details: a warty atomizer of "eau de pickle no. 19"; a pickle-shaped dish on a similarly shaped coffee table; even the protagonist's figure resembles a giant, plump pickle. When her niece finally bribes and bullies Mrs. Pickle into sampling some eggplant ripple ice cream, the heroine realizes she has been missing out. The rhyming text is sometimes clever, sometimes flat, as in the lines "Little Sophie Claire,/ however, always/ speaks her mind./ She's Mrs. Pickle's/ youngest niece,/ and she's/ one of a kind." While readers may still shrink from sampling eggplant ripple or turnip treacle ice cream, the buoyant story of Mrs. Pickle's enlightenment is a reminder that they just won't know unless they try it. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

School Library Journal

K-Gr 2 A zany, upbeat rhyming tale that bounces right along. Ample, red-haired Mrs. Pickle always dresses in green, wears "eau de pickle" perfume, eats pickle pie, and even feeds her pup pickle poodle food. She sees no reason to change her lifestyle, exclaiming that, "I like the things I like" and "I'm very sure of that." However, her equally stubborn niece, Sophie Claire, refuses to give up on introducing her aunt to different things. Finally, they make a deal: the girl will walk her aunt's dog and polish all of her aunt's shoes for an entire year if Mrs. Pickle will try a new ice-cream flavor. Unable to resist this trade, the woman samples eggplant ice cream and to her delight and surprise loves it. With this simple act, Mrs. Pickle discovers how boring her routine has been and thinks of all of the possibilities life has to offer, from making new friends to learning to dance and speak French. The bright, lighthearted, stylized illustrations of pickle-shaped furniture and the green eye-shadowed Mrs. Pickle set a harmonious tone and the full-page and double-page spread illustrations give her life and charm. No matter how picky children are, they should be pleased as punch with Mrs. Pickle. Carol Schene, Taunton Public Schools, MA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews

Mrs. Pickle is definitely a vision: she's rather pickle-shaped herself; is always dressed in her favorite color, green; has the tight orange curls of Lucille Ball; and plays fast and loose with some pickle-green eyeshadow. She has her favorite things and favorite habits, and she won't try anything new because "I like the things I like." Her niece, Sophie Claire, however, bored with all things pickle, makes her aunt an offer she can't refuse, and Mrs. Pickle at last tries a different kind of ice cream—eggplant ripple. She finds she likes it, and the final spread shows her in a bright red frock, learning to paint. The rhymed text is a little clunky and its message isn't for the subtle, but the pictures, with their acid greens and exaggerated gestural figures, have charm; children will see themselves in Mrs. Pickle's picky habits, and have a good laugh. (Picture book. 5-8)

 

The bears' vacation(PZ8.3.B45B45 1968)

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Illus. in full color. Papa Bear demonstrates his seaside safety rules—with disastrous results.

Arthur's honey bear (PZ7.H65a 1974)

ANNOTATION

Arthur decides to sell his old toys but is reluctant to part with his old bear.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Arthur and his sister Violet are selling their old toys—even Arthur's favorite Honey Bear. When his little sister buys his bear, Arthur misses him terribly. But Arthur realizes that even though he's growing up, he can still have a special relationship with an old friend. Young children will delight in the adventures of Arthur and Violet and this very special story about friendship.

FROM THE CRITICS

Sesame Street Parents Arthur a chimp, wants to have a tag sale to unload some of the junk he's outgrown. He prices his yo-yo and his hula hoop but balks at selling his old stuffed Honey Bear. This classic early reader, just republished as a picture book, contains wonderful watercolors of Arthur cradling his one-eyed friend. It ends happily when Arthur finds a creative way to let go without having to say good-bye.

Harry in trouble (PZ7.P83A7 1989)

ANNOTATION

Harry is upset about losing his library card three times in a row, but feels better when he learns that his father and his friend Dorcas sometimes lose things.

FROM THE PUBLISHER Lost: One library card

Harry put his library card in a very safe place. Now he can't find it! This is the third one he's had this year, and the librarian said she won't give him another. What is Harry going to do?

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly In the latest title of Porte and Abolafia's sensitive Harry books, Harry gets into trouble when he loses his library card not once, not twice, but three times. Harry can hardly stand to face Ms. Katz, the librarian, whose patience is beginning to wear thin. In the course of the story, Harry explains to his new friend Dorcas that (as readers of the previous books know) his mother died in a car accident when he was one year old. Luckily, Harry has a loving father and an attentive aunt who help him through his problem. Porte manages to enter into Harry's situation so fully that it is impossible not to share the boy's anxiety about the lost card, his fear of Ms. Katz and his lingering sorrow about the loss of his mother. Readers will identify with Harry and be as relieved as he is that all ends well. Ages 5-up. (Mar.)

密碼在說謊 (PS3552.B63Ch36 2005)

那些認為《達文西密碼》所鋪陳的劇情是事實多於作者的想像的人,會發現達瑞爾‧博克的評論讓他們心神不寧。博克教授以引人入勝和平易近人的方式謹慎地檢閱《達文西密碼》鼓吹的關鍵宣言,中肯地指出其如何缺乏歷史依據。面對這樣一個值得被分解的架構體,這是個不折不扣的拆毀工程;通情達理的評價,清楚地點出真實與幻想的差別所在。可惜,《達文西密碼》的作者頑皮地模糊了這兩者的差別,而博克教授則饒富興味地駁斥了其蓄意本質。對任何一位意欲從充分掌握相關證據,以建立個人信念的讀者,我大力推薦《密碼在說謊》這本書。
賴利.赫達杜博士 愛丁堡大學新約語言、文學及神學教授

  丹‧布朗《達文西密碼》的熱銷,造成了一股陰謀論的旋風效應,每個讀過小說的讀者,除了對書中言之鑿鑿的「歷史真相」大感驚異之外,也引發諸多議論:書中所說的,到底是不是真的?

  達瑞爾‧博克教授以嚴謹又不失趣味的方式,深入淺出地剖析《達文西密碼》中幾個具有爭議性的主題,例如:抹大拉的馬利亞為何被誤指為妓女?耶穌到底有沒有成婚?聖杯傳說真的是指基督的血脈嗎?神祕的諾斯底福音真的受到教會的打壓嗎?……等諸多疑點,提出歷史、神學及當代考古資料等詳實證據加以辯駁,破解小說的謬誤之處,幫助讀者釐清疑惑,還原事實真相。

  不論你是小說的忠實擁護者或反對派、基督徒或非教會人士、學者專家或一般大眾,你都不能錯過內容扎實精采、見解精闢透徹的《密碼在說謊》,它會撼動你對《達文西密碼》的觀感,正如之前小說撼動你一般。

本書特色
1.本書針對暢銷小說《達文西密碼》引發的熱潮和疑問加以剖析澄清,可吸引讀過小說的讀者、基督徒和學者專家。
2.中英雙書合訂本,加強雙語能力,且物超所值。
3.作者學有專長,引經據典、論證嚴謹,極具閱讀價值。

作者簡介

  達瑞爾‧博克(Darrell L. Bock, Ph.D.) 是新約聖經學的研究教授,目前任職於美國德州達拉斯神學院。個人專長領域包括聖經釋經學、如何運用舊約聖經研讀新約、歷史上的耶穌及福音書研究。除了在基督教領袖訓練神學中心教授「靈命發展與文化」課程外,他也擔任報紙《今日基督教》(Christianity Today)的通訊編輯。曾任福音派神學協會主席,現與太太莎莉和三個小孩居住在德州理察森市,並為該市三一教會的長老。

譯者簡介

  張偉民 ,國立台灣大學外文系畢業,現職為高中英文教師。香港出生,深得學生喜愛,總覺得自己身上長了一對天使的翅膀。已婚,育有一子一女,享受為人夫及為人父的樂趣.。酷愛讀英文和教英文,矢志與之終生情愫不渝。

Encyclopedia Brown and the case of the disgusting sneakers (PZ7.S1O2 1990)

NNOTATION America's Sherlock Holmes in sneakers continues his war on crime in ten more cases, the solutions to which are found in the back of the book.

ROM THE PUBLISHER

A stolen teacup...

An extra set of footprints...
Four very strange words...
A pirate's treasure...
And a race to find a cheater in Idaville's annual disgusting sneaker contest!

These are just some of the ten brain-twisting mysteries that Encyclopedia Brown must solve by using his famous computerlike brain. Try to crack the cases along with him—the answers to all the mysteries are found in the back!

FROM THE CRITICS

School Library Journal Gr 3-5-- Encyclopedia Brown, solving crimes for his police chief father, returns with 10 new solve-it-yourself mysteries. As usual, a solution for each case is in the back of the book. In the title story, the children of Idaville are raising money for charity by staging a Disgusting Sneakers contest. Phoebe, last year's winner, has one of her sneakers stolen; Encyclopedia Brown knows that something is afoot and quickly solves the crime. This new collection, as addicting as its predecessors and accompanied by black-and-white line drawings that track all the fun, will be in demand by fans everywhere. --Nancy Doe Maday, Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs

A Is for Annabelle (PZ8.3.T81 1954)

FROM OUR EDITORS

Two little girls discover the wondrous charms of grandmother's doll and the magic of the alphabet in this splendid tale. Recounting all of her favorite things, Annabelle the doll teaches the ABC's with a sweet spirit and elegant style.

Renowned illustrator Tasha Tudor outdoes herself with the charming detail of the lovely doll. Using her signature technique of exquisite watercolors, Tudor illustrates cloaks, dresses, and hats in beautiful splendor. Each page features a pretty oval trim of flowers such as roses and daffodils. Details such as Annabelle sleeping under her quilt in her bed or taking a stroll under the umbrella with the two little ladies reflect Tudor's love of all dolls. As Annabelle is shown throughout the house, young readers will appreciate the grand life of this little doll and learn that the alphabet can be simply extraordinary.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Celebrated illustrator Tasha Tudor creates a Victorian treasure filled with dolls and dresses in this splendid counterpart to the Caldecott award-winning counting book 1 Is One. Each letter stands for one of Annabelle's favorite accessories, from cloaks to lockets to parasols. Early readers and doll collectors will delight in this gloriously bedecked and bejeweled version of the ABCs.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Doll lovers of all ages will welcome the alphabet book homage A Is for Annabelle by Tasha Tudor, starring an exquisitely appointed doll and her accoutrements. Originally published in 1954, the volume alternates full-color spreads with b&w drawings, all steeped in Tudor's customary charm. (July) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Goldilocks and the three bears (PZ8.1.M35 1988)

ANNOTATION

While three bears go for a spin on their bicycle, a naughty little girl enters their house, eats a bowl of porridge, tries out their chairs and beds, and falls asleep.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

What a sweet child, says a newcomer in town about Goldilocks. That旧 what you think, a neighbor replies. For Goldilocks is one of those naughty little girls who does exactly as she pleases锎ven if that means sampling the three bears?porridge, breaking Baby Bear旧 chair, and sleeping in his bed. James Marshall旧 offbeat and inventive telling of this familiar tale will enchant readers, young and old. A delightfully irreverent retelling of an old favorite is illustrated with delicious humor and contemporary touches. ? Booklist , starred review

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Goldilocks is a self-satisfied adventuress in this comical retelling, a 1988 Caldecott Honor book. "The book boasts many jolly details and the pictures burst with color," said PW. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum A loopy contemporary humor marks Marshall's work. His writing has the syntax and phrasing and his illustrations the telling details that create a modern context for even the most traditional fairy tales. Goldilocks and the Three Bears opens thus: 'Once there was a little girl called Goldilocks. "What a sweet child," said someone new in town. "That's what you think," said a neighbor.' The accompanying illustration shows a blonde, curly-hair, fiercely scowling little girl about to splash water over three sweetly sleeping cats. My favorite illustration is of Goldilocks in Baby Bear's bed in the quintessential child's room chaos of heaped and scattered bats, toys, books, and clothes. 1998 (orig. Children's Literature - Julie Eick Granchelli James Marshall retells the story of Goldilocks, an adventuresome little girl, who takes a journey through the forbidden forest and comes upon the home of three bears, who are out on a bike ride. The bears return home to discover a little visitor sleeping in baby bear's bed. This Caldecott Honor Book is wonderfully illustrated with delightful detail and humor. 1998 (orig.

The tiny seed (QK49.C19 1987)

ANNOTATION

A simple description of a flowering plant's life cycle through the seasons.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Dazzlingly colorful collage illustrations and a simple but dramatic text tell the fascinating story of the life cycle of a flower in terms of the adventures of a tiny seed.

Carried aloft by the autumn wind, the tiny seed, along with other bigger seeds, travels far over the world. the journey is perilous: one of the bigger seeds is burned by the sun; another falls into the ocean; still another is eaten by a bird. Even after those that are left have landed on fertile ground and begun to grow, danger is near: one small plant is stepped on; one little flower is picked; but the tiny seed keeps growing almost unnoticed. Young readers will cheer at the happy outcome of this exciting tale. And they will long remember the heartening message of the tiny seed's steadfast perserverance in the face of many hazards and obstacles until its final joyful success.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly This picture book admirably conveys the miracle of a seed. Flower pods burst and dispatch their seeds on the wind; the air-borne seeds are subject to myriad disasters; and the ones that make it through the perils of the seasons to become mature flowering plants are still susceptible to being picked, trod upon and otherwise damaged. But nature allows for survivors, and so the tiny seed grows into a giant flower, releasing its seeds and continuing the cycle. As he has demonstrated with The Very Hungry Caterpillar and other books, Carle has an extraordinary kinship with nature. Here we have not just the explanation of the life of a flower, but drama, lessons of life and a lovely spirituality. This is a reissue of the original 1970 edition, with expanded, expansive collage illustrations. The pages, like the seed pods, burst with color. Ages 4-8. (March)

Publishers Weekly

Steve Lavis looks at animals foreign and domestic with two Peek-Through Board Books. On the Farm follows the wooly sheep as he searches out who has eaten its breakfast. As each page is turned, more animals become visible through the die-cut spaces. The culprits are found behind the tractor. In the Jungle follows the same format, only this time a crocodile is in hiding. "Here I am!" shouts the crocodile on the last spread. Then he asks, "Who wants to hide next?" ( Apr.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot

The fascinating cycle of plant growth is described in this board book by Eric Carle. It opens with autumn when the wind blows seeds into the air. Out of all the seeds that start the journey only a few make it to the ground in winter. Along the way some have been burned by the sun, fallen into the ocean to feed the fish, landed on a frozen mountain top or fallen onto the dry, inhospitable desert sands. It is not even safe on or in the ground. Birds feed on the seeds and mice nibble others that are in the ground. Finally, spring arrives and the seeds start to grow. Still there are dangers because weeds can grab all of the sun and rain that the little seeds need, but several manage to sprout. Once again all is not safe because a big human foot crushes one of the plants, and the flowers are so attractive that they are picked. During the summer one little seed survives and it grows into an enormous plant with the biggest flower that anyone had ever seen. Autumn comes and the entire cycle repeats. The collage illustrations are attractive and tell the story without needing to read the words. The board book version works from the standpoint of the illustrations, but there is a large amount of text in small type so the book's appeal may be to younger children with fairly long attention spans. This is part of the "A Classic Board Book" series. 2005, Little Simon/Simon & Schuster, Ages 4 to 7.

The Apple Pie Tree (SB363.H14H21 1996)

ANNOTATION

Describes an apple tree as it grows leaves and flowers and then produces its fruit, while in its branches robins make a nest, lay eggs, and raise a family. Includes a recipe for apple pie.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

The changing seasons bring a tasty surprise in this bright picture book from the author/illustrator team of It's Pumpkin Time!. Two young sisters watch in fascination as their apple tree changes, from bare in winter to bursting with pink blossoms in spring, and as robins build a nest. When autumn comes, the small green apples have grown big enough for picking--and for pie! Full color.

FROM THE CRITICS

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot Two kids get to follow the cycle of an apple tree through the seasons. The importance of weather and of bees for pollination in the development of the fruit is highlighted. Kids will also enjoy seeing that the tree provides a home for a family of robins (a la the Joyce Kilmer poem "Trees"). The book ends with the fruit cooked into a mouth-watering apple pie. Delightful collage and paint illustrations are large enough to work in a storytime session. An endnote provides more information about pollination, as well as a recipe for apple pie.

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1-From bud to fruit, two children follow the cycle of an apple tree as it is nurtured through the seasons. The book incorporates the role of bees and the weather in the production of the fruit. Another use of the tree is shown, as a pair of robins build their nest and begin a family. The story ends with a nice, warm apple pie being taken from the oven. The large pictures and text are suitable for young children. The colorful, clear-cut illustrations use a paint and paper collage technique. An end note shows how bees pollinate the tree's flowers and offers a recipe for apple pie. Great for sharing with a group or one-on-one.-Kathy Mitchell, Gadsden Co. Public Library, Quincy, FL

Kirkus Reviews

A simple nature story about an apple tree in winter, spring, summer, and fall.

"My sister and I have a tree that grows the best part of apple pie. Can you guess what that is? Apples!" In winter, the tree is brown, but in spring, leaves grow and a robin nests in the branches. In the days that follow, buds, blossoms, bees, tiny apples, and mature fruit appear. In the final pages, the two girls (with help from adults) make and eat an apple pie. A recipe is included, as is information on how the bee pollinates the apple flower. Halpern uses soft greens, browns, and pinks in the cut- paper collages; careful shading, painting, and layering give the illustrations dimensionality, with the textured nest and marbled tree trunk especially effective. An appealing study for young children.

Have you seen bugs?(QL467.2.O5B78 1996)

ANNOTATION

Describes in verse a variety of bugs and how they look, behave, and improve our lives.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Rhyming verse accompanies detailed paper sculptures in this stunning book which gives readers a vivid view of the lives of bugs, from their shapes to the work they do. Full color.

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Eye-popping artwork headlines this sensational picture book in praise of insects. Oppenheim's (Have You Seen Birds?) sprightly verse takes an up-close-and-personal view of bugs in all their splendid variety ("Bugs with stripes/ or speckles/ or spots,/ shiny like metal/ or covered in dots"). Meanwhile, Broda's exquisite painted paper sculptures, strategically placed against a series of watercolor backdrops, give the pages depth, texture and a brilliantly surreal flavor. Readers will be craning their necks for a "how did he do that?" look at the detail, from the intricate designs of a butterfly's wing to the gleaming metallic back of a beetle. Touching upon caterpillars and crickets, ladybugs and lacewing dragonflies, author and illustrator cover a lot of ground and, thanks to Oppenheim's hardworking verse as well as the careful art, they pack in a surprising amount of information. While this finely wrought book is particularly well suited to the learning style of younger readers, those at the upper end of the target group will no doubt be equally enthralled. Ages 5-8. (May) Children's Literature - Wendy Pollock-Gilson You will see bugs as you have never seen them before in this informational book on how bugs move, communicate, and even help people. Rhyming verse and full page color illustrations will catch the ear and eye while reading to oneself or others. Ron Broda's award winning three-dimensional paper sculptures of colorful bugs make this a unique and different addition for a library or a classroom collection of insect books. Additional bug information as well as identification of the bug illustrations by page number is provided at the end of the book.

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2-An alliterative, rhyming text is accompanied by dramatic, brilliantly colored, three-dimensional paper sculptures that were photographed to create the final images. This jubilant celebration of insects in a variety of habitats is reinforced informationally by a page-by-page listing of the insects depicted. While millipedes (diplopods) and spiders (arachnids) are not "bugs," most insects (class Insecta) are not "true bugs" either. All of the beasties shown are joint-legged arthropods. This is not a book for sophisticated report writers, but it's perfect for any youngster who has ever followed a flittering butterfly, pondered a spider spinning a web, or chased a twinkling firefly-and even more for those who dream of such joyous experiences. An eye-catching delight.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY

Fraidy Cats(PZ8.3.K88L58 1993)

ANNOTATION

One dark and noisy night the Fraidy Cats let their imaginations run wild, visualizing scary things from wild elephants to hungry wolves.

I can help (PZ7.W64 2003)

SYNOPSIS

No matter how hard he tries, Puppy just can't seem to do anything right! He knocks over blocks, and the garbage can, and flowerpots filled with dirt! But then he realizes that he must not quit and that making mistakes is okay.

Henry and Mudge get the cold shivers (PZ7.R98S4 1994)

ANNOTATION

When Mudge gets sick unexpectedly, Henry does all he can to make him feel better.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Henry and his 180-pound dog Mudge are best friends forever. And in this seventh book of their adventures, they spend a scary but reassuring day at the vet.

FROM THE CRITICS

School Library Journal K-Gr 3-When Mudge the dog gets sick and goes to the vet, both he and Henry share some scary moments. Henry shows his devotion to his canine friend as he pampers him through his cold. By Cynthia Rylant. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Emma Bean (PZ7.L51W64 1993)

ANNOTATION

Emma Bean, a homemade toy rabbit, joins Molly at birth and shares her trials and triumphs as she grows from infant to little girl.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Emma Bean has black button eyes and whiskers that curl up like a smile. She is Molly's best companion. Molly and Emma Bean do everything together -- taste new food, go to the doctors office, share bedtime secrets. Young children will cuddle their own special stuffed animals a little closer during the enchanting Emma Bean . "Will charm children and adults alike who have ever had an especially loved toy friend." -- Booklist Jean Van Leeuwen is the author of the bestselling Easy-to-Read books about Oliver and Amanda Pig, as well as many picture books and novels. She lives in Chappaqua, New York. Juan Wijngaard is also the author/illustrator of Going to Sleep on the Farm (Dial/Puffin).

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Pieced together from the ``scraps of long-ago dress,'' the button-eyed bunny Emma Bean is sent as a gift to the infant Molly. The toy's first encounter with ``her'' girl is not promising: ``there she was, face-to-face with a baby. . . . Its mouth was wide open and it was crying. The noise was just terrible.'' In the years that follow, the stoic stuffed animal accompanies Molly to the doctor's office, shares Molly's meals, participates willingly in Molly's father's game of Toss the Bunny, and listens to Molly's bedtime secrets. Van Leeuwen's tender yet unsentimental text is studded with telling details: runaway Molly packs ``her pillow and pajamas and crayons and motorcycle.'' Realistic watercolors echo the story's moods through clever use of light and shadow. While avoiding an anthropomorphic approach, the nostalgia-tinged illustrations give a sense of the myriad of emotions that seem to emanate from the toy rabbit. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)

Children's Literature - Joan Carris

It begins, "Once there was a rabbit and she had a girl," and continues with a nicely unsentimental tale of Emma Bean, a toy rabbit handmade for a girl named Molly. Emma gets dragged, hauled, soaked in the bath, injected at the pediatrician's office, and stained with food, but she and Molly are a pair for life. "I am going to keep her forever," Molly declares. Readers will find the enchanting and detailed watercolor illustrations more memorable than the story, which nevertheless has well-honed prose. 1997 (orig.

School Library Journal

PreS-K-``Once there was a rabbit and she had a girl.'' So begins the story of Emma Bean, made from the ``scraps of long-ago dresses'' by Molly's grandmother. The two are inseparable, from the child's infancy through Emma accompanying her on the first day of kindergarten, where they find new friends in Sara Louise and her bear Gloria. The text, which gently highlights the events in the pair's relationship, is simple and often rhythmic. The illustrations, from the glowing colors of the Maxfield Parrish-like cover to the intimate picture of Molly in bed whispering in Emma's ear with the shadows of night falling across them, capture readers' attention. The artist plays with light, color, and perspective to enhance the mood of the story. Occasionally there is an awkwardly rendered perspective as in the picture of Molly and her father tossing the bunny, which places viewers on the ceiling looking down, yet most are successful. Each full-page picture, set in a white border surrounded by a thin reddish line, evokes the feeling of an unfolding memoir, like pictures in an album. Kathryn Galbraith's Laura Charlotte (Philomel, 1990) is similar in both tone and in the lushness of the illustrations, although Emma Bean focuses more on the relationship between the child and her toy. A book that will appeal to many children.-Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY

Arthur's Halloween costume (PZ7.H65b 1984)

ANNOTATION

Arthur the chimpanzee, after worrying that his Halloween costume won't be scary enough, wins a prize for the most original costume in the school.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

No one knows what Arthur's funny-looking costume represents, but even his school principal calls it a winner!

Slip! slide! skate! (PZ7.H42B49 1999)

ANNOTATION

A young girl who wants to be the best ice skater in the whole class learns that it is just as important to have fun.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

A young girl tries to be the best at everything she does. Her ice skating class is going to be in an ice show. And her determination to be the best skater causes her to frown on her classmates1 less-than-perfect practice sessions. They laugh and giggle with each misstep. She cannot imagine having fun when putting on a show is most important. But on the day of the Ice Show, she trips and causes everyone to fall down. Instead of being angry with her, her fellow skaters laugh. She finds herself laughing too ?and discovers that enjoying what you do is just as important as being the best.

FROM THE CRITICS

Children's Literature When Mom gives her young daughter skating lessons, the child knows that she "will be the best ice skater on my block." Soon she is gliding and on her way to becoming the "best skater in our whole class!" When fellow students fall down and giggle, she regards them with disdain. Annie, the teacher, tells the class that they will skate in a line holding hands for the Ice Show. Our little perfectionist thinks the assignment sounds too easy. She doesn't want to have fun, she wants to be the best. Without giving the ending away, it is safe to say that the protagonist learns to have fun, even if it means not being the best. This lighthearted "Hello Reader!" book illustrates an important point. Children, even very young children, are often driven by parents, coaches and themselves, in sports and in academics, to succeed at all costs. It is hard to have fun when all one worries about is winning. Adorable pictures capture the spirit of this diverse group of young skaters. 2000, Cartwheel Books/Scholastic, . Ages 4 to 7. Reviewer: Jeanne K. Pettenati

Henry and Mudge under the yellow moon (PZ7.R98S1 1991)

ANNOTATION

In the autumn Henry and his big dog Mudge watch the leaves turn, meet with some Halloween spooks and share Thanksgiving dinner.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

In the autumn Henry and his big dog Mudge watch the leaves turn, meet with some Halloween spooks, and share Thanksgiving dinner.

Glasses for D.W. (PZ7.B81b 1996)

ANNOTATIO

N Arthur's little sister wants to wear glasses like her brother and tries to prove she needs them.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

D.W. wants to wear glasses, just like her big brother, Arthur. After Arthur explains that without his glasses a hat looks like a bat and some string looks like a ring duck, D.W. sets out to prove that everything looks funny to her, too. Finally, Arthur finds a way to make his sister see the situation a bit more clearly!

Harry and the lady next door (PZ7.Z6G76a 1988)

ANNOTATION

Harry the dog goes to fantastic lengths to make his neighbor stop singing.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

In 1957, Harper published its first I Can Read title, Little Bear, written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Large type, simple vocabulary, chapter-like divisions, and decorative pictures made Little Bear perfect for emerging readers閠hey could read the story comfortably and not feel overwhelmed by the text. Following suit came such classics as Peggy Parish's Amelia Bedelia series, Lillian Hoban's books about Arthur the monkey, and Syd Hoff's popular Danny and the Dinosaur. Many books in this series are special in the depth of emotion evoked - Little Bear, the Frog and Toad books by Arnold Lobel, and Daniel's Duck by Clyde Bulla, to name a few - and all are enjoyed by children of all ages. Preschool - Grade 1.

Not enough room!(PZ8.3.R59O3 1998)

ANNOTATION

When two sisters have to move into the same room, they use tape to divide the room into different shapes so that each one can have her own space. Includes related activities.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Young readers learn important relationships among shapes in this story about two sisters who busily rearrange furniture to comfortably share one bedroom. Full color. 32 pp. Ages 5-7. Pub: 3/98.

FROM THE CRITICS

Children's Literature - Karen Porter Sisters Kris and Pat are told they need to share a room to make way for a new baby. The sisters experiment with basic geometry as they use sticky tape to divide their shared room first into rectangles and then into triangles. In the end, they realize that sharing the whole room is the best choice. Both the story and the expressive illustrations avoid a common stereotype of mathematicians as white males, providing a positive role model for girls. Marilyn Burns is a well-known author of educational math activities used by teachers in many elementary level classrooms. She provides a letter to parents and suggestions for math activities to use with the book for additional learning. Both are valuable to parents wishing to take part in their children's education. This book is part of the "Hello Math" series, which includes more than a dozen books for kids, ages 3 to 9.

Mr. Brown can moo! Can you? (PZ8.3.S8m 1970)

ANNOTATION

Mr. Brown is an expert at imitating all sorts of noises.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Like the parent Beginner Books, Bright & Early Books feature the same affordable hardcover format, imaginative stories, and colorful pictures. Geared for a younger audience, these books use simple words, repetition, and pictures that act as clues to the text. Contributors include Dr. Seuss ("Mr. Brown Can Moo!" "Can You?," "There's a Wocket in My Pocket!," "The Foot Book"), Stan and Jan Berenstain ("Inside, Outside, Upside Down; Bears on Wheels"), Al Perkins ("Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb") and Michael Frith ("I'll Teach My Dog 100 Words"). Preschool - Grade 1.

SYNOPSIS

The talented Mr. Brown displays his virtuoso art through a variety of noises. Not only can he moo like a cow, but he can blurp like a horn, sizzle like an egg in a frying pan, pop like a cork , eek eek like a creaky shoe, and even imitate the sound of a hippopotamus chewing gum (grum, grum, grum)! The silly rhyming text makes this a wonderful book to read aloud and giggle along with the listeners!

I'll teach my dog 100 words(PZ8.3.F91E7 1973)

FROM THE PUBLISHER

In this simple adaptation of Michael Frith's classic Bright & Early Book™, I'll Teach My Dog 100 Words, a pet owner doesn't just teach basics like beg and bark, but also such unlikely canine commands as Shine my shoe! Kiss a goose! and Clean the zoo!

Oh, the thinks you can think!(PZ8.3.S8n 1975)

ANNOTATION

Relates in verse some of the unusual thinks you can think if only you try.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Back in 1957, Theodor Geisel responded to an article in Life magazine that lamented the use of boring reading primers in schools. Using the pseudonym of "Dr. Seuss" (Seuss was Geisel's middle name) and only two hundred twenty-three words, Geisel created a replacement for those dull primers: "The Cat in the Hat." The instant success of the book prompted Geisel and his wife to found Beginner Books, and Geisel wrote many popular books in this series, including "Hop on Pop," "Fox in Socks," and "Green Eggs and Ham." Other favorite titles in this series are "Go, Dog, Go!" and "Are You My Mother?" by P. D. Eastman, "A Fly Went By," by Mike McClintock, and "Put Me in the Zoo," by Robert Lopshire. These affordable hardcover books combine large print, easy vocabulary, and large, bright illustrations in stories kids will want to read again and again. Grades 1 - Grades 2.

Bears on wheels(PZ7.B45B45ac 1969)

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Illus. in full color by the authors. A gradually increasing number of bears "adds" up to an unusual counting book for beginning readers.

Ronald Morgan goes to bat (PZ7.G36N21 1988)

ANNOTATION

Although he can't hit or catch, Ronald Morgan loves to play baseball.

FROM THE CRITICS

School Library Journal K-Gr 2 Giff scores again in writing an honest, funny, and understanding story about Ronald Morgan. Ronald is an awkward but enthusiastic baseball beginner who is grateful to be on the team. He has a generous team spirit, and he tries hard to be a good player. Initially discouraged because he cannot hit the ball, Ronald eventually discovers his error (he keeps his eyes shut when he swings at the ball) and he starts to improve. Giff has the marvelous gift of encouraging and comforting children when they are faced with small but important personal challenges, and she shows them developing into capable kids. Her gentle humor is pervasive and her honesty consistent both in dialogue and text. The colorful, expressive illustrations are a bright asset. A sure spring selection. Barbara Peklo Serling,

Abel's island (PZ7.S3A3 1976)

ANNOTATION

Accustomed to a life of leisure, gentlemanly Abel must be resourceful to survive after he finds himself stranded on a remote island. Newbery Honor Book; ALA Notable Children's Book. Black-and-white illustrations.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Abel's place in his familiar, mouse world has always been secure; he had an allowance from his mother, a comfortable home, and a lovely wife, Amanda. But one stormy August day, furious flood water carry him off and dump him on an uninhabited island. Despite his determination and stubborn resourcefulness--he tried crossing the river with boats and ropes and even on stepping-stones--Abel can't find a way to get back home.

Days, then weeks and months, pass. Slowly, his soft habits disappear as he forages for food, fashions a warm nest in a hollow log, models clay statues of his family for company, and continues to brood on the problem of how to get across the river--and home.

Abel's time on the island brings him a new understanding of the world he's separated from. Faced with the daily adventure of survival in his solitary, somewhat hostile domain, he is moved to reexamine the easy way of life he had always accepted and discovers skills and talents in himself that hold promise of a more meaningful life, if and when he should finally return to Mossville and his dear Amanda again.

FROM THE CRITICS

AudioFile - Susan B. Stravopoulos While attempting to retrieve his wife旧 scarf, the wealthy, indolent Abel is carried away in a flash flood. He finds safety on a little island which, for the next year, becomes a place of endeavor and self-discovery. Steig旧 classic fable of Abelard Hassam di Chirico Flint, a stuffy, smug mouse, makes marvelous reading aloud. As read by the ever-talented Guidall, it旧 superb. Steig旧 vocabulary is considerable and, while some of the concepts may escape a younger audience, Guidall旧 smooth rendition, perfectly accented, propels the adventure forward with magical consistency, never losing sight of the protagonist旧 character. No one could read it better. This is a joy for all ages. S.B.S. 呸udioFile, Portland, Maine

When we were very young (PR6025.M63S4 1992)

ANNOTATION

A collection of poems reflecting the experiences of a little English boy growing up in the early part of the twentieth century.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

When We Were Very Young , the first of A.A. Milne's four world-famous books for children, introduced Christopher Robin to innumerable friends, and has probably been read more widely than any other book of verse for children published in our time.

FROM THE CRITICS

School Library Journal Gr all levelsPenguin's production amplifies the fact that A.A. Milne has created some of the most memorable poetry and prose in children's literature. Charles Kuralt narrates all the tapes. When We Were Very Young resounds with Kuralt's lively reading of the nonsensical and onomatopoetic rhymes that fill the heads of toddlers. Opposite these poems, the narrator reads, with loving care, the verses about the real and imaginary playmates that warm youngsters' hearts. Now We Are Six reflects the growing complexity of a child's world. The narrator's voice is soft and vulnerable when reading of the innocent, inquisitive thoughts that preoccupy children, yet Kuralt speaks with a touch of exasperation when reading the poems depicting the young's struggle to understand the adult world. He does equally as well with Milne's stories. All the inhabitants of the Hundred Acre Wood are introduced and their humorous escapades chronicled in Winnie-the-Pooh. While portraying the characters, Kuralt's child-like tone reflects their goodness, innocence, and wee intellect. The House at Pooh Corner continues the adventures of Pooh and introduces the bouncing, pouncing, lovable Tigger. Besides the delight children will experience when listening to the light-hearted, captivating stories, young listeners will also identify with the universal hopes, fears, and wishes of the characters. Kuralt's deep, learned-sounding voice gives the narration a fatherly, comforting feel. Libraries will want to acquire these high quality productions.Mark P. Tierney, William B. Wade Elementary School, Waldorf, MD

For sheer delightfulness the children's rhymes of A.A. Milne are in a class by themselves, with their charm, humour, and understanding - to say nothing of their irresistible rhythms.

Ernest H. Shepard's illustrations are an important complement to the verses. A.A. Milne has here created a book of proven classic quality, a book that goes straight to the heart.

My first Bible in pictures (BS551.2.T21H76 1989)

ANNOTATION

Presents simple retellings of 125 Bible stories accompanied by review questions.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Colorful children's Bible storybook that features three-minute Bible stories by Kenneth N. Taylor.

SYNOPSIS

Colorful children's Bible storybook that features three-minute Bible stories by Kenneth N. Taylor.

Book Description
This best-selling classic has sold nearly 2 million copies in over 90 languages around the world. This repackaged edition contains all the same material as the classic--125 of the best-loved stories from the Bible, retold in simple words by Kenneth N. Taylor. Each story is illustrated with beautiful art by Richard and Francis Hook. Preschoolers and beginning readers will be excited to call this Bible their own.

Card catalog description
Presents simple retellings of 125 Bible stories accompanied by review questions.

Good work, Amelia Bedelia (PZ7.P21S3d 1976)

A busy day

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers leave for the day and give Amelia Bedelia a long list of chores to do. Not one to stand still, Amelia Bedelia gets right to work — with totally unexpected results!

FROM THE CRITICS

Children's Literature - Amy S. Hansen Perpetually naïve Amelia Bedelia strikes again, misunderstanding and misinterpreting more simple instructions. She pots the plants by putting them in her cooking pots. She is asked to make a simple chicken dinner, and presents her employers with plates covered with chicken feed. And, my favorite, she gets bread dough to rise by tying the pan up with string and attaching the string to a pulley system. My main complaint with this book is the inconsistency of the character. Amelia is supposed to be a good cook, and yet she serves raw eggs to Mr. Rogers because he asks for eggs and toast. She makes an amazing butterscotch cake, but doesn't know anything about sponge cake. From an adult's viewpoint the book becomes implausible, and for that matter, adults may find the jokes overused①melia has been around for 40 years. However, young emergent readers are still likely to enjoy her mistakes, at least until they read the other fifteen Amelia Bedelia books. Lynn Sweat's drawings give Amelia a cheerful if not amazingly intelligent persona. 2003, Greenwillow/HarperCollins,

 

Little blue and little yellow (PZ8.9.L66 1959)

FROM OUR EDITORS

Little Blue and Little Yellow are so happy to see each other that they hug and hug until they are united into one green mass. When they return home, nobody recognizes them, but when they begin to cry, their tears separate them back into their original selves. Their parents are so relieved that they all hug. This gentle parable offers simple lessons in color, friendship, and acceptance.

ANNOTATION

A little blue spot and a little yellow spot are best friends, and when they hug each other they become green.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Little blue and little yellow share wonderful adventures. One day, they can't find one another. When they finally meet, they are overjoyed. They hug until they become green. But where did little blue and little yellow go? Are they lost?

FROM THE CRITICS Horn Book An unusual, imaginative, stimulating, and appealing picture book.

Cloudy with a chance of meatballs (PZ7.B27B27 1987)

ANNOTATION

Life is delicious in the town of Chewandswallow where it rains soup and juice, snows mashed potatoes, and blows storms of hamburgers--until the weather takes a turn for the worse.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

The tiny town of Chewandswallow was very much like any other tiny town except for its weather which came three times a day, at breakfast, lunch and dinner.
But it never rained rain and it never snowed snow and it never blew just wind. It rained things like soup and juice. It snowed things like mashed potatoes. And sometimes the wind blew in storms of hamburgers.
Life for the townspeople was delicious until the weather took a turn for the worse. The food got larger and larger and so did the portions. Chewandswallow was plagued by damaging floods and storms of huge food. The town was a mess and the pople feared for their lives.
Something had to be done, and in a hurry.

SYNOPSIS

Grab your plates! In the land of Chewandswallow, meals - rather than rain or snow - fall from the sky. But something goes awry: the food falling from the sky gets larger and larger, causing the residents to make an escape before being squashed by giant pancakes or rolls. Ron Barrett dishes up some droll art work in this zany tall tale.

Betsy who cried wolf (PZ7.L57N17 2002)

FROM OUR EDITORS

The Barnes & Noble Review
Who ever heard of a sheepdog in wolf's clothing? In a delightful twist on the traditional fable, Ella Enchanted author Gail Carson Levine shows that with a little generosity and trust, even the hungriest wolf might not be a bad guy after all.

Newly appointed as shepherd, Betsy promises to be the best one around. But Zimmo, the mountain's last wolf, is ravenous and creates a surefire dinner scheme. Appearing several times and looking deceitful, Zimmo scares poor Betsy into frantically blowing her warning whistle. But when the villagers come running, Zimmo is gone. Eventually, the townsfolk get annoyed with Betsy's cries, and when the wolf pops out to snatch a sheep, they don't show up. Fortunately, though, the clever shepherd has a stash of pies, and she gives some to the famished wolf instead. So grateful to Betsy for her kindness, Zimmo later rescues a few of Betsy's sheep as they near a cliff, and the two form a friendship that results in good herding teamwork.

Children will be howling over Levine's lighthearted tale. Betsy is a spunky heroine whose stick-to-itiveness and quick thinking will have readers in admiration. Scott Nash's ( Saturday Night at the Dinosaur Stomp ) illustrations are a rollicking complement, adding a wonderfully playful element to the story. Readers won't be sheepish about asking for more of Betsy Who Cried Wolf! (Matt Warner)

ANNOTATION

A serious young shepherd finds that there is more than one way to keep a wolf from eating her sheep.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

On her eighth birthday Betsy takes the Shepherds' Oath and is determined to be the best shepherd in Bray Valley history Any wolf who tries to eat her sheep had better watch out But Zimmo is no ordinary wolf-he's a hungry wolf — with a Plan!

In her first picture book, Newbery Honor author Gail Carson Levine puts her own spin on a traditional tale, while Scott Nash brings a comic sensibility to this hilarious retelling. The result will tickle, delight, and even leave readers with a moral or two, or three....

FROM THE CRITICS

Publishers Weekly Best known for spinning new interpretations of classic fairy tales, Levine (Ella Enchanted) here ventures into folktale territory with a perky, girl-centric take on The Boy Who Cried Wolf. On her eighth birthday, Betsy receives a very special gift: the people of Bray Valley entrust her with the care of a flock of sheep. After taking the Shepherd's Oath and arming herself with Mom's pies and a wolf-watching checklist from Shepherd School, Betsy begins her new job on the mountainside. There, Zimmo, a hungry, lonely wolf with a Plan awaits her. In the original tale's tradition, Betsy alarms the local farmers with cries of wolf until they no longer believe her. But in a sweet-natured twist, Betsy wins over the wolf, who becomes her friend and co-shepherd. Despite a text sprinkled with plenty of fun-to-say words and names, not much tension builds, and the friendship forged between Betsy and Zimmo seems abrupt. However, Nash's (Over the Moon; Saturday Night at the Dinosaur Stomp) slightly anthropomorphic sheep always walking on their two hind legs sport natty woolen coiffures and demonstrate a penchant for wisecracks. Hilarious hand-lettered asides (The pie is mightier than the fang; Baaaaaad sheperdess!) give the sheep personality and lend the proceedings a snappy tone. Betsy, clad in skirt, sweatshirt and embroidered jeans, seems to straddle the Old World and the new. Kids may well cheer her courage and can-do spirit. Ages 4-8. (June) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

School Library Journa

l K-Gr 2-In this amusing retelling of the classic fable, eight-year-old Betsy has just taken the Shepherd's Oath. "She was going to be the best shepherd in Bray Valley history. And any wolf who tried to eat her sheep had better watch out!" However, Zimmo, the last wolf left on the mountain, comes up with a plan. He appears to Betsy, causing her to blow her whistle and seek aid, but then disappears when the farmers arrive, destroying her credibility and sending her back to Shepherd School. When she returns to the job and he tries his ruse again, no farmers come when Betsy calls, but she is determined to defend her flock. When she goes to hurl her plate of shepherd's pie at Zimmo, she suddenly realizes how skinny he is, and gives him the food to eat instead. Grateful, he helps the child rescue some of the sheep that are dangling over a precipice, and eventually he, too, takes the Shepherd's Oath and joins her on the hillside. The irony of the fact that the sheep are being saved from wolves so that they may be eaten by people will probably be lost on the intended audience, but the running commentary on events made by the sarcastic and silly sheep will not. Nash's cartoonlike illustrations, with their clean lines, crisp colors, and folk-art touches, add considerably to the story. This pleasant addition could generate discussion when paired with the original tale.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews

Levine continues her tradition of reworked fairy tales with strong heroines begun with Ella Enchanted (1999) in this delightful tale of a bright young girl who can stand up for herself and the sheep she guards. When Betsy turns eight, she proudly takes the Shepherd's Oath, determined to be the best shepherd ever. Meanwhile, the last wolf on the mountain is hungry, lonely, and devising a plan to have sheep for his next meal. When Zimmo makes his appearance before Betsy and her flock, she blows her whistle and the farmers come running. But the crafty Zimmo has disappeared-part of his master plan. He repeats the show the next day-same deal. Sent back to Shepherd School and given one last chance, she packs her lunch and tends her flock. But there is Zimmo again, and this time he is charging right at them. Blowing her whistle fails to bring any farmers, so Betsy gets ready to hurl her lunch at the wolf, at which point he sits down and howls for food. Realizing that he is just hungry, the crafty heroine feeds him and he leaves the sheep alone. The sheep sum up one of the story's morals quite nicely: unlike the original fairy tale, "People who cry wolf may be deceived and not deceivers." Nash's (The Bugliest Bug, not reviewed, etc.) personified sheep are a stitch-walking on two legs, posing for a dive into the Soakenwetz River, belaying down a cliff, and always commenting on the current state of the story. Especially funny are the endpapers, where readers can eavesdrop on the sheep's conversations. A must-have. (Picture book. 4-10)

  

 

 

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